Insightful Thoughts from Andy Rooney

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It’s 2010, yep, a new decade, new life. I’ll be the first to admit it, I hate Andy Rooney. There are two people who I hate more than anything one of them is Andy Rooney (no, I won’t tell you the other). The ancient man is 91 and I think it’s about time for him to retire, say goodbye to journalism, and just get a house on the beach in Mexico where no one can find him again. The old guy should just resign.

Anyone in PR should be watching “60 Minutes” every week. The show is a league apart from any other news program out there, and it gets tainted by ending each week with that man that just complains about life. Andy Rooney is the perfect example of why there are such misunderstandings between generations — because they refuse to adapt to the times. It has been my experience that the older someone is, the less they are willing to accept and adapt to new technology and new ideas. A lot of older PR pros are holding onto the same ideas that they have been using since the 90s, and they wonder why they can’t keep clients, business, or get publicity. Some people still use the huge books from Cision/Bacons, rely on the Fax machine — actually call them facsimile — and need everything in hard copies, copied three times over. Why do you need three copies of the same thing? You don’t. It’s time to wake up, advance, and throw the stuff you think is good away.

Now I typically change the channel when “60 Minutes” decides to say, “and now, Andy Rooney,” but on January 10th, I wasn’t quick enough with the remote. Andy was talking about his “Hoarding” habit. In this episode Andy was complaining that everything he owns is obsolete, but that he won’t get rid of anything. Still having a black and white television in his basement, four laptop computers, and eight electric razors, Andy emphasized the fact that his stuff is too good for the “dump.” Could this mentality really be the reason that we hoard stuff? Because our stuff is to good to be thrown away? I don’t think so, but it actually made me ponder a bit.

Turns out, I suffer from “hoarding” syndrome. I hold onto everything and everything, because you never know when you’ll need that extra game of Bananagrams, the jackets from 1999, or that empty bottle of Jack Daniels that you drank in one night freshman year. I have about 47 shirts, 12 pairs of pants, and 11 pairs of shoes, I honestly never realized how much stuff I hold onto until I moved to New York City, a month ago. I need help in getting rid of stuff, but I just don’t know what to get rid of. After this was brought to my attention by the dreadful, Andy Rooney, I now can’t stop throwing stuff away.

Thank you Andy, for putting a foul taste in my mouth every Sunday night before I go to bed. Thank you Andy, for pointing out my flaw that I can not stop thinking about. Thank you Andy, for making me have to buy a bunch of new things because I threw most of my life away when I actually did need things. You rock.

*I don’t care for Katie Couric either, but honey, if that’s what you have to look forward to when you’re in your 90s, god help us all.*

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  • http://twitter.com/LauraScholz Laura Scholz

    I feel the exact same way about Andy Rooney! Great post.

  • http://www.bradmarley.com/ Brad

    In the early aughts, he called the media center where I was working to request some information for an upcoming show.

    When I made the mistake of not immediately recognizing who he was, I believe his response was something along the lines of, “Whaddya mean you don't know who I am? I'm Andy Rooney!”

    True story.

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  • http://twitter.com/CTMichaels CTMichaels

    hahahahaha that is fabulous! hahahhahaha

  • jeffespo

    You know, much like Beetlejuice Andy Rooney will show up in your apartment if you say his name 3 times fast.

    Good thing he helped you break your habit. Who is person #2 that you hate? Please say Macaulay Culkin or Dustin Diamond.

  • http://www.jackmonson.com/ JackMonson

    Love your rant on Rooney! Yes, Mr Rooney, you've lived through the Depression, WWII, and other tragic events of the last 91 years. We get it….it was tough. You know what's really tough? Being someone who has gone through the same things and who has NOT had a fat CBS contract for the past several decades.

    The same outdated thinking that goes with the media directories and faxes you mentioned is still happening when it comes to journalist / blogger / influencer outreach. Just because you can blast an irelevant release out to 500 people doesn't mean you should. PR spammers are on the list of “I hope they retire soon”….right after Andy Rooney.

    More rants on PR Spam on my blog http://www.jackmonson.com

  • http://twitter.com/CTMichaels CTMichaels

    What's a press release?

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  • Mark Hugh Miller

    You’re culturally illiterate. Andy Rooney is akin to a national treasure. His reflections on his own experience reflect an America that no longer exists, but was so powerful it smashed a fascist onslaught on two fronts, at a time when America was mired in depression. God, what a simple-minded, poorly-educated, ignorant fool you are. How about we choose between your ridiculous crowing, and Andy Rooney. I think you lose bigtime.

    • http://twitter.com/CTMichaels CTMichaels

      <3 <3 I think I win <3

      • Mhmllr

        You think a lot of things that aren’t true. You, Jared Loughner, the whole sick crew of geeks living in their parents’ basements.

        • http://prbreakfastclub.com PR Cog

          Mark –

          I do believe you’ve stepped off the deep end on this one and I’m absolutely sure Mr. Rooney wouldn’t approve of you comparing any American citizen who happened not to like him to a crazed spree killer all.

          In fact I’m pretty sure Mr. Rooney’s reaction would be something along the lines of, “Well if you don’t like what he has to say then don’t visit the blog-thing they’ve got going on. Let them waste their time, not yours.”

          One more inappropriate comment and we will have to block your comments from the site. The only reason I’m keeping this one up for now is so that the google bots can do their thing.

          • Anonymous

            Well, I apologize for comparing “author” C.T. Michaels to a crazed political assassin who lives in his mother’s basement. John Boehner and Rick Perry would never say such things. But it dismays me when I stumble across culturally illiterate, snarky putdowns of older people who aren’t sold on contemporary American life. Rooney may be corny, repetitious, and not be as witty as he fancies himself, but he should be viewed with compassion (in the Buddhist sense; I’m not talking about pity) for what he is – despite his affectation of being a gruff and cranky oldster, a Luddite in regard to technology – a living connection to an older America that was more dignified, more private, an America in which standards were higher and clearer and elegance meant something, a time when elegance was a kind of statement, a way of dressing up the world, and so a generous act. I think Rooney is a living reminder in the age of Oprah that personal dignity is always, still, an option, a choice that is open to you.

            Well, I apologize for comparing “author C.T.
            Michaels” to a crazed political assassin some months ago. But it dismays me when I stumble
            across culturally illiterate, snarky put-downs of older people. Rooney may be
            corny, repetitious, and not as funny as he fancies himself to be, but
            if you look at the guy’s C.V., it’s impressive and rich by any measure. He
            should be taken for what he is, a living a connection to an
            older America that was more dignified, more private, an America in
            which  standards were higher and clearer and elegance meant
            something, a time when elegance was a kind of statement, a way of
            dressing up the world, and so a generous act. I think Rooney is a
            living  reminder in the age of Oprah that personal dignity is
            always,  still, an option, a choice that is open to you. If you can’t see it in his affected scruffy manner, you’re incapable of understanding American culture in the first half of the 20th century. It wasn’t “retro”, it wasn’t “Mad Men”; it was a far more serious time, and its dwindling alumni are finding the worlds of Facebook and Oprah and Twittering and texting a cold and impersonal alternative to a wholly different world in which face-to-face encounters were paramount.

          • Anonymous

            Well, I apologize for comparing “author” C.T. Michaels to a crazed political assassin who lives in his mother’s basement. John Boehner and Rick Perry would never say such things. But it dismays me when I stumble across culturally illiterate, snarky putdowns of older people who aren’t sold on contemporary American life. Rooney may be corny, repetitious, and not be as witty as he fancies himself, but he should be viewed with compassion (in the Buddhist sense; I’m not talking about pity) for what he is – despite his affectation of being a gruff and cranky oldster, a Luddite in regard to technology – a living connection to an older America that was more dignified, more private, an America in which standards were higher and clearer and elegance meant something, a time when elegance was a kind of statement, a way of dressing up the world, and so a generous act. I think Rooney is a living reminder in the age of Oprah that personal dignity is always, still, an option, a choice that is open to you.

            Well, I apologize for comparing “author C.T.
            Michaels” to a crazed political assassin some months ago. But it dismays me when I stumble
            across culturally illiterate, snarky put-downs of older people. Rooney may be
            corny, repetitious, and not as funny as he fancies himself to be, but
            if you look at the guy’s C.V., it’s impressive and rich by any measure. He
            should be taken for what he is, a living a connection to an
            older America that was more dignified, more private, an America in
            which  standards were higher and clearer and elegance meant
            something, a time when elegance was a kind of statement, a way of
            dressing up the world, and so a generous act. I think Rooney is a
            living  reminder in the age of Oprah that personal dignity is
            always,  still, an option, a choice that is open to you. If you can’t see it in his affected scruffy manner, you’re incapable of understanding American culture in the first half of the 20th century. It wasn’t “retro”, it wasn’t “Mad Men”; it was a far more serious time, and its dwindling alumni are finding the worlds of Facebook and Oprah and Twittering and texting a cold and impersonal alternative to a wholly different world in which face-to-face encounters were paramount.

  • Mark Hugh Miller

    We really don’t care about your obsessions. Meantime, Andy’s self-mocking humor is lost on you, because your postings reveal you as a regressive narcissist, a man locked in adolescence. God, the internet is a pirate’s ball, allowing the most infantile to rant. You shame yourself, pal. And I suspect you have few friends.

    • http://twitter.com/CTMichaels CTMichaels

      odd, seems that the majority of comments here agreed with me. God, the internaet is a pirate’s ball, allowing the most infantile to rant, pal.

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