Want to Run Your Own Business? There’s a Book for That


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So, the time has come and you want to be your own boss. Maybe you’ve been forced into this because of a company’s downsizing or maybe you would rather work from home to have additional freedom. If you do a Google search, you are sure to find a ton of links to books and seminars to assist you along the way.

I’ve been contemplating my own future, so when I had an opportunity to read Richard Walsh’s book, “The Start Your Own Business Bible,” I jumped at it. If you are even close to thinking like I am, this book is worth a read.

Walsh breaks down each business into how much you will need to start, with statistical information at the beginning of every entry. It shows you potential earnings, start-up cost, advertising, and the bottom line, to name a few.

Since this a PR-centered blog, let’s focus on our fine field. Walsh estimates the start-up cost for a PR business is between $5,000 and $10,000. What I liked the most though was Walsh’s “Bottom Line Advice.” He hit it right on the head when writes:

“As a solo practitioner, you’ll start with small projects and gradually expand your network and contacts to take on more complex campaigns. PR is not just about ‘liking people.’ It’s a demanding profession that requires excellent verbal and written communications skills, as well as the ability to network effectively with clients and media representatives.”

I also liked the fact that Walsh mentions that to gain credibility in the industry, a solo practitioner should consider becoming accredited with PRSA.

By the way, if you are looking to be a marketing consultant, Walsh estimates you’ll need the same cost as it would be for a PR business.

Overall, I found what I read from Richard Walsh’s book to be concise and incredibly helpful. Most importantly, it gives the reader a realistic expectation. There are no false realities.  The book is well worth a purchase.

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